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by January 12, 2022
An obituary for a Minnesota manufacturing worker blamed his death on Joe Biden's vaccine mandates and the experimental Covid jab. Derek Andrew McIntosh, 41, died unexpectedly last week from blood clots caused by a Covid-19 vaccination, according to an obituary posted online last week. The jab was clearly mandated by McIntosh's workplace. "Derek Andrew McIntosh died unexpectedly in the early morning hours of January 4th, 2022, due to complications from blood clots sending him into cardiac arre...
by January 11, 2022
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by January 11, 2022
In a notice issued Monday evening, local Communist Party authorities in Anyang, China, ordered all of the city's 5.5 million residents to observe strict stay-at-home orders after health officials detected an increase in Anyang's Chinese coronavirus caseload, Xinhua reported on Tuesday. According to Xinhua, China's official state-run news agency, Anyang's municipal government "issued orders banning all vehicles from roads and requiring all residents to stay put while an epidemiological investiga...
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Twitter has suspended @ExposeFauci, an account set up by Project Veritas to promote the organization's most recent bombshell, the release of documents revealing US government involvement in gain of function research on bat-borne coronaviruses in China. In February 2021, Project Veritas' main Twitter account was banned. Twitter claimed that the journalistic organization's attempts to interview Facebook VP Guy Rosen at his home violated the platform's "posting private information" policies. Twit...
by January 10, 2022
For no apparent reason, America First broadcaster Nick Fuentes has been banned from GETTR, the platform run by former Trump advisor Jason Miller. At the end of last month, Fuentes, the host of the popular nightly show "America First," was first barred from GETTR, an ostensibly free speech alternative to Twitter. Earlier this week, The Blaze's Elijah Schaffer contacted GETTR, who Schaffer claims told him Fuentes had broken their terms of service, but did not specify which posts constituted the ...
by January 9, 2022
Mayor Eric Adams (D) endorsed legislation by the city council on Sunday that will automatically become law, allowing up to one million noncitizens residing in New York City to vote. As previously reported in November, Adams has always been in favor of the move. "I think that New Yorkers should have a voice in their government," Adams stated in a statement obtained by the New York Post on Saturday. "While I had some reservations about one part of the law at first, I had a fruitful conversation...
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Global News Daily
by Published posted January 8, 2022

Ambulances in Kansas race toward hospitals before abruptly changing directions due to overcrowding.

Employee shortages in New York City create delays in garbage collection and subway operations, as well as a reduction in the number of firemen and emergency responders.

Security checkpoints at Phoenix's busiest airport have been shut down, and schools around the country are struggling to locate instructors for their classes.

The current outbreak of omicron-fueled coronavirus infections in the United States is disrupting essential operations and services, the latest example of how COVID-19 continues to upend lives more than two years after the pandemic began.

"This really does, I believe, remind everyone of when COVID-19 first arrived and there were such tremendous disruptions throughout every aspect of our daily lives," said Tom Cotter, director of emergency response and preparation at Project HOPE, a global health group.

"And the awful fact is that we won't be able to forecast what will happen next unless we raise our worldwide immunization rates."

To keep the public safe, first responders, hospitals, schools, and government organizations have used an all-hands-on-deck strategy, but they're not sure how much longer they can keep it up.

Paramedics in Johnson County, Kansas, work an average of 80 hours each week.

Ambulances have been known to be compelled to change course when the hospitals they're headed to say they're too busy to assist, which confuses the patients' already worried family members travelling behind them.

Because there are no beds available when ambulances arrive at hospitals, some emergency patients are forced to wait in waiting rooms.

When the head of a rural hospital had no where to take its dialysis patients this week, Dr. Steve Stites, chief medical officer at the University of Kansas Facility, said the hospital's staff checked a textbook and "tried to put in some catheters and find out how to do it."

He described the situation as a "double punch" for medical institutions.

COVID-19 patients increased from 40 on December 1 to 139 on Friday at the University of Kansas Hospital.

At the same time, more than 900 workers — or 7% of the hospital's 13,500-person staff — have been afflicted by COVID-19 or are awaiting test results.

"What I'm hoping for, and what we're crossing our fingers for, is that once it peaks, it'll have the same quick decrease we saw in South Africa," Stites said, referring to the country's dramatic decline in the number of cases. 

"We have no idea."

That's all there is to it."

The omicron version spreads far faster than other coronavirus strains, and it has already taken hold in a number of nations.

It also infects persons who have been vaccinated or have been infected by earlier versions of the virus more easily.

Early investigations reveal, however, that omicron is less likely than the prior delta form to cause severe disease, and that immunization plus a booster still provide substantial protection against serious illness, hospitalization, and death.

Despite this, its ease of transmission has resulted in an increase in cases in the United States, harming companies, government offices, and public agencies equally.

Customers lined up outside a pharmacy in downtown Boise, Idaho, before it opened on Friday morning, and the line wove its way inside the big drugstore.

Staffing shortages have hit pharmacies, either because workers are unwell or have quit completely.

Prior to the epidemic, pharmacy worker Anecia Mascorro said the Sav-On Pharmacy where she works usually had prescriptions available the following day.

The hundreds of orders that are coming in are now taking much longer to fill.

"The demand is insane - everyone isn't obtaining their prescriptions in a timely manner, so they keep transferring to us," Mascorro added.

As of Thursday, the virus has taken the lives of over 800 police and fire officers in Los Angeles, creating somewhat lengthier ambulance and fire response times.

Because of a virus-related personnel shortage, authorities in New York City have forced to postpone or reduce garbage and subway services.

In recent days, nearly one-fifth of subway operators and conductors — 1,300 individuals — have been missing, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

According to Sanitation Commissioner Edward Grayson, about a quarter of the municipal sanitation department's employees were off ill on Thursday.

"Everyone is working 12-hour shifts around the clock," Grayson added.

The city's fire service has likewise made adjustments to account for the increased absenteeism.

Officials claimed that 28 percent of EMS employees were off ill on Thursday, compared to approximately 8% to 10% on a typical day.

There were also twice as many firemen as normal.

The ill rate at the police department, on the other hand, has decreased in the last week, according to authorities.

According to claims from airport and TSA authorities, two checkpoints at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport's main terminal were shut down because not enough Transportation Security Administration personnel showed up for work.

Meanwhile, despite widespread teacher absences, schools around the country attempted to sustain in-person education.

Classes have been suspended in Chicago for the previous three days due to a heated impasse between the school administration and the teachers union over remote learning and COVID-19 safety standards.

Nearly 900 educators and aides in San Francisco called in sick on Thursday.

In Hawaii, where public schools are administered by a single statewide agency, 1,600 teachers and staff were missing on Wednesday due to sickness, vacation, or leave. The state's teachers union chastised school authorities for failing to adequately prepare for the vacancy that would result. Counselors and security guards were being called in to "babysit a classroom," according to Osa Tui Jr., president of the Hawaii State Teachers Association.

Tui remarked during a press conference, "That is very unacceptable."

"What is the purpose of having this approach when there are so many instructors out and the department says, 'Send your child' to a classroom that doesn't have a teacher?"

Administrators have assisted in covering classes in New Haven, Connecticut, where hundreds of teachers have been out each day this week.

Some instructors say that although they appreciate it, it might be perplexing for kids, adding to the physical and emotional stress they are already experiencing as a result of the epidemic.

"We've already been put to the test.Can the rubber band extend this far?" Leslie Blatteau, president of the New Haven Federation of Teachers, was asked this question.

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